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Evaluating the Michigan Access Management Program: Findings and Lessons Learned

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Eisele, W., W. Frawley and T. Doyle, “Evaluating the Michigan Access Management Program: Findings and Lessons Learned,” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No 2223, Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C. (2011) 

Missouri: A Comprehensive Process for Developing a Statewide Access Management Program

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Plazak, D., N. Beeman, and M. Finley, “Missouri: A Comprehensive Process for Developing a Statewide Access Management Program,” Mid Continent Transportation Symposium Proceedings, Iowa State University, (2000) [Online] Available http://www.ctre.iastate.edu/pubs/midcon/FRONT.PDF

NCDOT School Impact Calculator

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NCDOT School Impact Calculator http://www.ncdot.org/doh/preconstruct/traffic/congestion/CM/MSTA/schools.html

NCDOT developed a school impact calculator to help new schools and their consultants determine traffic impacts and how to handle potential traffic on site. The Department also provides technical assistance to schools to ensure appropriate access and circulation design for autos, bicycles and pedestrians.

NCDOT Comprehensive Transportation Plan Study

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NCDOT Comprehensive Transportation Plan Study [Online] http://www.ncdot.org/doh/preconstruct/tpb/planning/study.html NCDOT works with local governments to develop Comprehensive Transportation Plans (CTP that tie land use with transportation planning and seek to identify the type of access control for each facility in the long term.

Strategic Highway Corridors Concept Development Report

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Strategic Highway Corridors Concept Development Report, October 2005, http://www.ncdot.org/doh/preconstruct/tpb/SHC/concept/ . (presented by D. Wasserman at the 7th National Access Management Conference (2006). The Strategic Highway Corridors concept is an initiative to protect the mobility function of critical highway facilitie

Raised Medians and Economic Impact on Adjacent Businesses

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The use of raised medians in urban areas has increased in recent years. Raised medians restrict access to businesses along a corridor by limiting turning movements to select mid-block locations. Therefore, a very common remark at public hearings related to the construction of raised medians is that there will be detrimental economic impacts on adjacent businesses. However, the restricted access allows more efficient signalization and traffic flow along the corridor, potentially providing more customers for the businesses.

Missouri: A Comprehensive Process for Developing a Statewide Access Management Program

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The Missouri Department of Transportation (MODOT) is responsible
for one of the largest state-jurisdiction road systems in the United
States. Missouri has recently decided to embark on an access
management program and has focused on utilizing access management
mainly to meet safety, traffic operations, and economic development
goals. The Missouri Access Management program development process
involves a number of key steps. These include:

Access Management Implementation in Kentucky

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      This report represents Kentucky’s continued efforts to institute a state-wide access management policy, as set forth in the 2004-2008 Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) Joint Strategic Plan.  The suggestions made herein build upon the initial recommendations laid out in Access Management for Kentucky (which had also included an access management implementation plan).

Access Management Programs in Selected States: Lessons Learned

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            This paper provides an overview of current access management programs in various states, and is one of few uncovered that focus on “lessons learned” during the development and implementation of the programs. Although few specific details are provided, it does include general suggestions that may be useful for the chapter on state program development. Examples of the lessons learned include hiring a large enough staff dedicated to the program, creating a separate bureau/ department/division for access management, and including a process to handle waivers.

Signal Spacing

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Stover, V.G. Signal Spacing,  Technical Memorandum, Center for Urban Transportation Research, (October 2007), unpublished. Available at http://www.cutr.usf.edu/programs/pcm/pub.shtml

            This technical memorandum addresses the rationale for spacing of intersections that are signalized and those that might be considered for signalization at some time in the future. It includes draft prototype regulations. 

Right Turn from Driveways Followed by U-Turn on Four-Lane Arterials: Is It Safer Than Direct Left Turn?

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Pirinccioglu, F., J. Lu, P. Liu and G. Sokolow, “Right Turn from Driveways Followed by U-Turn on Four-Lane Arterials: Is It Safer Than Direct Left Turn?” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 1953, Washington, D.C. (2006)

Evaluation of Geometric and Operational Characteristics Affecting the Safety of Six-Lane Divided Roadways

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Petritsch, T., S. Challa, H. Huang and R. Mussa, Evaluation of Geometric and Operational Characteristics Affecting the Safety of Six-Lane Divided Roadways, Sprinkle Consulting, Incorporated, Florida Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration (2007)

A Programmable Procedure to Calculate Number of Traffic Conflict Points at Highway Intersections

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Traffic conflict points at intersections are the points at which traffic movements intersect (including crossing, merge, and diverge). Numbers and distribution of conflict points have been used to evaluate intersection access management designs and safety performance. Traditionally, determination of numbers of conflict points for different traffic movements has been based on manual methods, which causes the difficulty for computerized procedures to evaluate safety performance of different access management designs.

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