Documents in the Category: Corridor Plans

NCHRP Synthesis 337: Cooperative Agreements for Corridor Management

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Williams, K., NCHRP Synthesis 337: Cooperative Agreements for Corridor Management, Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. (2004)
This report reviews the state of the practice in developing and implementing cooperative agreements for corridor management, elements of such agreements, and best practices or lessons learned. It includes several case examples of cooperative agreements. Below are a few excerpts from the report relative to effective agreements.

Guide for Analysis of Corridor Management Policies and Practices

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Williams, K. and C. Hopes. Guide for Analysis of Corridor Management Policies and Practices, prepared for the Florida Department of Transportation, (2007)
The guide provides detailed guidance for conducting a corridor management policy analysis including:
• steps in evaluating local government policies and practices,
• methods for identifying implementation needs, and
• a framework for recommending policy changes, including examples and resources for further information.

Effective Strategies for Comprehensive Corridor Management

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Seggerman, K. and K. Williams. Effective Strategies for Comprehensive Corridor Management, prepared for the Florida Department of Transportation, Center for Urban Transportation Research, Tampa, FL, 2004.

This study includes numerous case studies of effective corridor management plans, processes and policies.

Maine’s Best Practices for Development of Multi-Modal Corridor Management Plans

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Androscoggin Valley Council of Governments, Maine’s Best Practices for Development of Multi-Modal Corridor Management Plans, (2007)
This report offers a step by step approach to development of a regional corridor management plan. For example, it includes an effective summary of the appropriate roles of the DOT and Regional Councils in the planning process, Advisory Committee Procedures and Goals, and examples of data needs.

Practices in Access Management

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Demosthenes, P. “Practices in Access Management,” ITE Journal, Institute of Transportation Engineers, Washington, D.C., vol 80, issue 1, (January 2010, pp. 46 – 51)

This article provides practical guidance on developing and implementing an access management program. It includes guidance relative to access classification systems, access design practices, variances and corridor access management plans. It will be especially useful in the chapters on access classification systems and state program development.

Applying Access Management Across the Transect

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Presentation Strader, Brad. “Applying Access Management Across the Transect: Complete Streets,” Proceedings of the 90th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board (presentation only), (January 2011) This presentation suggests a simpler adaptation of the CSS transect framework in ITE’s Designing Walkable Thoroughfares (2010) as a means of organizing access management strategies according to context. It also offers several case examples of these applications in typical rural, suburban and urban contexts. Figure 2 illustrates the overall concept.

Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares

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The context sensitive solutions (CSS) approach keys thoroughfare types with place types that reference aspects of the roadside context. An implicit goal of CSS is to reduce the dominance of roadway capacity in roadway design decisions by more directly integrating other modal and community design considerations – particularly those design details critical to supporting non-auto modes in the urban context. The approach also strives to maintain an optimal balance between desired roadway operations and the roadside context.

Basic elements of the approach are as follows:

Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares

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The context sensitive solutions (CSS) approach keys thoroughfare types with place types that reference aspects of the roadside context. An implicit goal of CSS is to reduce the dominance of roadway capacity in roadway design decisions by more directly integrating other modal and community design considerations – particularly those design details critical to supporting non-auto modes in the urban context. The approach also strives to maintain an optimal balance between desired roadway operations and the roadside context.
Basic elements of the approach are as follows:

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