Documents in the Category: Land Development

Quantifying Countermeasure Effectiveness

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Wilson, Petritsch, Quantifying Countermeasure Effectiveness, Orlando, FL, PBIC, November 2008.

Pedestrian and bicycle professionals sometimes encounter resistance when proposing crash countermeasures, due either to competing interests along a corridor or the desire to cut costs. Quantifying the effectiveness of corridor-length countermeasures such as medians, lighting and bicycle lanes will help proponents make a better case for these elements.

Model Regulations and Plan Amendments for Multimodal Transportation Districts

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Williams, K. and K. Seggerman, Model Regulations and Plan Amendments for Multimodal Transportation Districts, National Center for Transit Research, Center for Urban Transportation Research, Tampa, FL, (2004)
This report includes suggested comprehensive plan amendment language and land development regulations that relate to access management in a multimodal environment.

Applying Access Management Across the Transect

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Presentation Strader, Brad. “Applying Access Management Across the Transect: Complete Streets,” Proceedings of the 90th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board (presentation only), (January 2011) This presentation suggests a simpler adaptation of the CSS transect framework in ITE’s Designing Walkable Thoroughfares (2010) as a means of organizing access management strategies according to context. It also offers several case examples of these applications in typical rural, suburban and urban contexts. Figure 2 illustrates the overall concept.

Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares

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The context sensitive solutions (CSS) approach keys thoroughfare types with place types that reference aspects of the roadside context. An implicit goal of CSS is to reduce the dominance of roadway capacity in roadway design decisions by more directly integrating other modal and community design considerations – particularly those design details critical to supporting non-auto modes in the urban context. The approach also strives to maintain an optimal balance between desired roadway operations and the roadside context.

Basic elements of the approach are as follows:

Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares

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Click here if you liked this information

The context sensitive solutions (CSS) approach keys thoroughfare types with place types that reference aspects of the roadside context. An implicit goal of CSS is to reduce the dominance of roadway capacity in roadway design decisions by more directly integrating other modal and community design considerations – particularly those design details critical to supporting non-auto modes in the urban context. The approach also strives to maintain an optimal balance between desired roadway operations and the roadside context.
Basic elements of the approach are as follows:

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