Documents in the Category: Networks

Combined AMAG & AM Manual

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 TRB's newest publications on access management draw on national and state research to respond to the need for a more coordinated approach to transportation and community design that preserves the safe and efficient movement of peoples and goods, provides supporting networks in developed areas, and reinforces desired urban form.

FDOT 2017 Complete Streets Handbook

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The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Complete Streets Handbook and new FDOT Design Manual will help us provide more context-sensitive roads by putting "the right street in the right place."   This draft document is under review until July 31, 2017

FDOT Complete Streets Policy Adopted September 17, 2014

Executive Summary

An Expanded Functional Classification System for Highways and Streets

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TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) has released a pre-publication, non-edited version of Research Report 855: An Expanded Functional Classification System for Highways and Streets. This report builds upon preliminary engineering of a design project, including developing the purpose and need. In particular, it provides additional contexts beyond urban and rural, facilitates accommodation of modes other than personal vehicles and adds overlays for transit and freight.

Corridor Access Management

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FHWA/Safety/Intersection/Intersection Safety

Imagine a multilane urban/suburban roadway where traffic is heavy, yet moves well; accommodates drivers, pedestrians, and bicyclists; allows easy entry to and exit from businesses and other destinations; and has fewer crashes and other conflicts. Chances are this road is benefitting from corridor access management, a strategy that seeks an appropriate balance between the safety and mobility of a roadway facility with the access needs of adjacent land uses.

ACHIEVING MULTIMODAL NETWORKS

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ACHIEVING MULTIMODAL NETWORKS

APPLYING DESIGN FLEXIBILITY & REDUCING CONFLICTS 

 FHWA-HEP-16-055 Aug 2016

This resource provides practical real-world planning and design information to help communities achieve connected pedestrian and bicycle networks. These networks help people of all ages and abilities get where they need to go, including to and from jobs, school, grocery stores, health care, recreation, and transit. Complete multimodal networks enhance access to opportunity for everyone and help reconnect communities.

Second International Conference on Access Management Proceedings 2014

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Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Access Management held in Shanghai, China, September 25-27, 2014. Sponsored by the Access Management Committee of the Transportation Research Board; Tongji University; Shanghai Jiaotong University; the Research Institute of the Ministry of Public Security, PRC; the Research Institute of Highway, PRC; the Ministry of Transportation, PRC; and the Construction Institute of ASCE

Access Management Manual 2014 - 2nd Edition

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TRB’s Access Management Manual, second edition, provides guidance on a coordinated approach to transportation and community design that is designed to help enhance mobility, provide greater mode choice, and improve environmental quality. The content is interdisciplinary, with guidance pertinent to various levels of government as well as to pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorized vehicles, including trucks and buses. Access management is addressed comprehensively, as a critical part of network and land use planning. Key updates include

2014 Proceedings from International Conference on Access Management Shanghai China

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Presentations from ICAM 2014 Sept 25-26, 2014

YouTube Video from Opening Ceremony

Younjie Zhang, Vice Chairman and Secretary-General of Shanghai Highway & Transportation Society

Marc Butorac, Chair TRB Committee on Access Management Opening Remarks

Richard Cunard, TRB Representative

Hangie Lin, Vice Dean, School of Transportation Engineering, Tongji University

Model Regulations and Plan Amendments for Multimodal Transportation Districts

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Williams, K. and K. Seggerman, Model Regulations and Plan Amendments for Multimodal Transportation Districts, National Center for Transit Research, Center for Urban Transportation Research, Tampa, FL, (2004)
This report includes suggested comprehensive plan amendment language and land development regulations that relate to access management in a multimodal environment.

Applying Access Management Across the Transect

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Presentation Strader, Brad. “Applying Access Management Across the Transect: Complete Streets,” Proceedings of the 90th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board (presentation only), (January 2011) This presentation suggests a simpler adaptation of the CSS transect framework in ITE’s Designing Walkable Thoroughfares (2010) as a means of organizing access management strategies according to context. It also offers several case examples of these applications in typical rural, suburban and urban contexts. Figure 2 illustrates the overall concept.

Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares

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The context sensitive solutions (CSS) approach keys thoroughfare types with place types that reference aspects of the roadside context. An implicit goal of CSS is to reduce the dominance of roadway capacity in roadway design decisions by more directly integrating other modal and community design considerations – particularly those design details critical to supporting non-auto modes in the urban context. The approach also strives to maintain an optimal balance between desired roadway operations and the roadside context.

Basic elements of the approach are as follows:

Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares

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The context sensitive solutions (CSS) approach keys thoroughfare types with place types that reference aspects of the roadside context. An implicit goal of CSS is to reduce the dominance of roadway capacity in roadway design decisions by more directly integrating other modal and community design considerations – particularly those design details critical to supporting non-auto modes in the urban context. The approach also strives to maintain an optimal balance between desired roadway operations and the roadside context.
Basic elements of the approach are as follows: